Design your high school diploma in Pasadena

Your advisors in Pasadena help you craft your own pathway to graduating with a high school diploma. Choose classes that are meaningful to you, from a wide range of subjects.

Over 90% of the students who attend a top university earn a US High School Diploma. This four-year program (which is also accepted by universities worldwide) allows you to choose from a wide range of subjects in the arts, humanities, sciences, and maths. At EF Academy, you work closely with your Advisor and University Counselor to customize a personalized study program based on your interests and goals.

What is the High School Diploma?

EF Academy Pasadena provides holistic university preparation in mathematics, science, history, English, world languages, the arts, and physical education. You work closely with your University & Academic Counselor to customize a personalized pathway to graduation based on your interests and goals.

On successful completion, you are awarded a High School Diploma by the State of California and earn a transcript of high school credits sufficient to apply to most universities around the world. You also earn a grade and high school credit for each course, which is reflected in an official transcript that you submit with your university applications. EF Academy students also graduate with a Mastery Transcript that showcases the strength of your work and the depth of your unique abilities.

If you have already begun high school in your home country, you can still earn your diploma in California. Your University Counselor will partner with your previous school to ensure you can apply credits previously earned to your High School Diploma in Pasadena.

Advanced Placement Courses

Advanced Placement (AP) courses are recognized worldwide for their academic rigor and often a requirement for admission to top universities. They introduce high school students to first-year college content in a broad array of subjects. High performance on AP exams can earn students college credit at some universities, including the University of California system. Some universities outside of the US will require a particular set of AP courses and exams as part of admissions.

Advanced Study Courses

Advanced Studies (Adv) courses are designed by our faculty to provide in-depth study in topics that are more typically explored in 2nd or 3rd year University courses. These courses emphasize a project-based or research-based approach. They are honors-designated and recognized for being equal in rigor to AP classes.

Course offering 2024-2025

English


English Language Lab is a curricular support class for students whose first language is not English. The coursework offers students instruction, feedback, and resources designed to support English learners in the reading, writing, speaking, and listening tasks expected of them in their content courses. The course emphasizes English writing and speaking skills (presentations) and offers instruction around academic writing and the research process, a key component of competency-based learning and project-based learning at EF Academy. Experiential learning and Field Study are a part of this course to provide students real life experiences to use and practice English outside the classroom. This course is designed to enhance students’ confidence in their English ability.

During this grade 9 course, students learn some basic structures of reading and writing to explore different aspects of identity: who they are, their home cultures, and who they want to become. This includes specific skills related to narrative, explanatory, and creative writing, prewriting, research, and continued vocabulary and grammar acquisition. During this course, students read and engage with texts in collaborative literature circles, as well as various pieces of nonfiction and shorter fiction. Narratives they encounter act as windows into cultures and situations different from theirs, while others may be mirrors that reflect some of their own experiences. This course appeals to students interested in collaboratively discussing and analyzing English literature, mechanics of writing and personal expression, and exploring their personal identity and culture.

During this grade 10 course, students move from learning the basic structures of reading and writing to a more sophisticated ability to express their understanding of themselves and the world at large. This includes developing specific skills related to organizational schema for analytical and narrative analysis/expression and continued vocabulary and grammar acquisition. During this course, students read and view several anchor texts, as well as various pieces of nonfiction and shorter fiction. They deepen their understanding of complex themes around the tension between the identity of the individual and the pressures of society, philosophical questions around nature and nurture, and the importance of understanding and recognizing human rights violations around the world. This course appeals to students interested in deepening their understanding of English literature, mechanics of writing and personal expression, as well as tensions informing the creation of personal identity and culture.

History and Storytelling is a yearlong team-taught course offered to 9th and 10th grade students. In this course, students will take a thematic and transdisciplinary approach to understanding the importance of storytelling and meaning making for humans. With each session focused around a thematic core, students will look at various cultural artifacts, narratives and works from different regions and time periods. Students will focus on developing core research, outlining and composition skills, as well as creative writing and journaling practices. Throughout the year, students will investigate the different narratives (both literary and historical) put forth by cultures throughout history; and investigate the nature of how identity is shaped by the stories we tell ourselves. This course is designed for students to fully take advantage of the possibilities of with CBL and PBL based learning and as such will be focused on providing students with multiple opportunities to engage deeply in interdisciplinary and interest-based projects as the class investigates a central theme. This course appeals to students who are excited in engaging in a transdisciplinary approach to learning in which they can advance their English skills of composition and comprehension as well as their historical skills of researching and comparative analysis while expressing and exploring their creativity and interests.

American Literature is a year-long 11th and 12th grade course that prepares students to build a better world through research and storytelling. Students use interviews, historical inquiry, and research to strengthen written and oral communication skills and challenge their close reading and interpretations of texts and the world around them. By reading the world through an analytical, critical, and empathic lens, students develop a deep understanding of diverse perspectives that have shaped the field of American Literature. Students expand their understanding of textual analysis and American literature, broadening their definitions of art and storytelling. Some of the questions students explore include: What is the American Dream and who has access to it? What are this nation’s stories and who gets to tell them? How can literature and reading the world through an analytical lens inspire critical responses? What kinds of narratives do cultures and individuals create? This course appeals to students interested in making connections between American literature and contemporary society, both in America and in their home countries. This course is beneficial to students looking to deepen their reading, writing, presentation, and critical thinking skills, with a focus on formulating a thesis with clear supportive evidence that analyzes a central argument.

Journalism is an 11th and 12th grade course that teaches students how to formulate questions, interview subjects, gather research, synthesize information, and ultimately produce content in print, digitally, and for social media. Students learn the roles, responsibilities, and ethics of student journalists and practice the various forms of non-fiction writing for an audience of students, staff, and community stakeholders, with the purpose of promoting school culture and global awareness. This class requires mature collaboration to effectively tell meaningful and authentic stories for our EF community and beyond. This course appeals to students interested in improving their research and writing skills while learning about their own community, as well as its intersections with global issues and changemakers. This course will benefit students interested in fields related to journalism, reporting, and social media engagement.

What is the meaning of Life? What decisions and epistemological frameworks help us to fashion our lives into one with both meaning and worth?   Throughout history, various religious, spiritual, and philosophical texts have explored these questions in order to help us make better decisions in our lives. The class will engage with seminal historical, literary, and spiritual texts that seek to teach and explain what are the essential qualities and responsibilities of living a meaningful life. This course appeals to students interested in analyzing, discussing and reflecting on complex ideas and concepts that lie at the heart of the human condition. This course is beneficial for students interested in fields such as Philosophy, Law, Comparative Literature, Sociology, and other humanities majors.

This AP English course is all about rhetoric. Students discuss rhetorical situations, exigence, how an author crafts their writing tailored to a specific audience, the rationale behind specific stylistic decisions, and how these come together to achieve a given purpose. Fiction is not often read in this class, as the focus is on non-fiction: letters, political speeches, philosophical texts, etc, however, a few fiction pieces may be read through the lens of rhetorical analysis. The course begins with the basics of argumentation: the rhetorical situation. Students are introduced to the rhetorical triangle, speaker/writer, audience, message/purpose, context, and exigence. They then practice with mentor texts to begin deconstructing the bare bones of an argument: basic claims and logical support, before moving into more advanced work and preparation for the AP exam. This course appeals to students interested in the way language works in persuasive manners. Students with a context of American history, politics, and social constructs will find this course appealing as many of the texts deal with these areas of thought. This course is beneficial for students looking to go into fields of study including English, Law, Psychology, Sociology, and more.

AP English Literature and Composition focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about imaginative literature (fiction, poetry, drama). The works students engage with are pulled from various time periods, traditions, languages, and moments in history. A strong understanding of history, from ancient to modern, will greatly aid a student’s ability to critically analyze and engage in the work. The course underscores the importance of understanding imaginative literature to both provide meaning to and engage the reader. Because of this, a strong foundation in the study of rhetoric is built early on. Students continuously consider the structure, style, theme, figurative language, symbolism, and imagery of every work they read. Assessments largely focus on writing, including expository, editorial, analytical, argumentative, and narrative styles. This course appeals to students who enjoy verbal reasoning, literature, critical theory, and open discussions. These are key skills required for college, and it will benefit students to refine these talents before moving on to university and beyond.

Through focused study of a variety of works of poetry and short fiction, this course provides students with opportunities to sharpen their skills in close textual reading and in analyzing, synthesizing, and critiquing the ideas and forms of the poetic and the short story genres. The exposure to various poetic approaches and narrative voices contributes to increased student empathy for opposing perspectives and hones student abilities to frame their responses with sensitive and constructive objectivity. Additionally, through various experiential and expository activities, students are allowed to discover, refine, and revise their narrative voices. This course is also designed to provide the fiction and poetry writer with an opportunity to study the art and craft of narrative and poetic writing within a supportive environment. This course appeals to students interested in writing as a form of art and personal expression. Students will learn how to refine their ideas into works of fiction and poetry. This course will benefit students interested in fields related to creative writing, communication, and publication.

Screenwriting is an advanced studies course for 11th and 12th grade students. This course provides students with the opportunity to interpret selected movies and screenplays through critical analysis. In this class, students will develop an understanding of the conventions and standards of the screenwriting genre and the mythic structure outlined in The Writer’s Journey. By the end of the course, students will be able to define and identify mythic archetypes in film and television and craft sequences that demonstrate the elements of story: plot, character, setting, etc. Throughout the course, students will be expected to give caring criticism when critiquing peers' work, accept caring criticism from peers and instructor, and revise and improve previous efforts. This course appeals to students interested in storytelling and film. This course will benefit students interested in developing different interpretation techniques related to literature and students interested in pursuing film/cinematography majors offered in college.

History


In this course, students explore our long human history—beginning before humans existed and connecting to our present moment. This course equips students with the historical thinking skills necessary to examine how and why societies change, how we define ‘progress’, and what we can learn about the past to better inform our present. Students work on collaborative projects and Socratic seminars, where they think critically, engage in creativity, and learn how to communicate. What does it mean to be human? How do people develop strategies to live in their environments? What disruptions to those strategies force change and what is that change? These are a few essential questions that we expect our students to grapple with. This course appeals to students looking to develop their historical thinking skills by doing assignments that focus on the following: critical reading and annotating of primary and secondary resources, evaluating resources and improving research skills, constructing and evaluating historical interpretations and frameworks, essay writing, presentations, evaluating causes and effects, analyzing comparisons, making historical analogies, and improving time management, organization, and study skills.

Modern World History & Geography is a contemporary history and social studies course set from 1750 to the present day. It begins with an overview of the world in 1750–the social makeup, the economic spheres of influence, dominant political entities, and the circumstances of the masses. It analyzes relationships between revolution and evolution, industrial revolutions, social upheavals, and labor and society. There is a distinct focus on gender disparities, disputes centered on ethnicity, the reaches of empire, and the massive changes brought about by the 20th century. Students express their knowledge and understanding in a number of ways, ranging from performing role-plays, giving speeches, participating in Socratic seminars, working on creative writing projects, and building dioramas. Students are also asked to pair primary and secondary sources with their preexisting knowledge so as to encourage historical thinking. This course appeals to students who wish to take a survey course of the world with questions of equity, inclusion, and diversity as the center stage. It will benefit students who need to improve their analysis of primary sources and strengthen their argumentative writing skills, both of which will be necessary in their later years of high school and beyond.

This is a dual-credit English and History course; please see the English section of this guide for the full course description.

What does it mean to be an American in a global context? To what extent is "American Exceptionalism" a reality? What does active citizenship look like? And how can we better understand other perspectives? Students wrestle with these open-ended questions, while developing a strong foundation of knowledge in American history, government, and culture. Students examine the span of American history from the pre-colonial period to the late 20th century, while developing the key skills of an historian. Interpretive and experiential in scope, this course challenges students to compare and critique multiple narratives of American history through engaging discussions, role-playing activities, and project-based assessments. Examining the global context of American historical events, as well as local historical connections to Los Angeles County, allows students to see that history is all around them. Developing students’ voice in oral presentations and analytical writing is a combined curricular focus with Grade 11 English courses. This course appeals to students who wish to focus on developing strong critical analysis skills. A research paper on a key event in American history will help to advance these skills and will also serve as a writing sample for future college and internship applications.

A course on history and sport in the United States typically explores the intersection of sports and American society, tracing the evolution of sports within the cultural, social, economic, and political contexts of the nation. This multidisciplinary approach delves into how sports have influenced and been influenced by historical events, societal norms, race, gender, class, and identity. This course appeals to students who enjoy sports and are interested in a unique approach to American History. This course offers continuous development of historical skills while being multifaceted, encompassing factors such as personal identity, storytelling, critical thinking, teamwork, and the social aspect of sports in the world around us.

This is a year-long course designed to replicate the experience of an introductory college human geography course. We use geographic processes to systematically study and understand spatial patterns that are evident in the world in which we live by focusing on the distribution, processes, and effects of human populations on the planet. Units of study include population, migration, culture, political geography, economic development, industry, agriculture, and urban geography. We focus on geographic models and their applications. We also use several case studies to compare these themes. Students demonstrate proficiency by taking exams in traditional AP format, quizzes, essays, research papers, projects, and presentations. Key frameworks of this class include human-environment interactions, the study of spatial distribution, and trends in contemporary demography. Students ask themselves: how was this world created, and how can I effect change within it? This course appeals to students who would like to challenge themselves in a wide variety of disciplines. It will benefit students who wish to explore the intersection of hard and social.

In this course, students study the cultural, economic, political, and social developments that have shaped the United States from circa 1491 to the present. This course provides students with an overview of American history to the present day. We study the main political, economic, social, and cultural developments during this period so that students understand the chronology of U.S. history and how individual facts fit into a bigger picture. This course also enhances students' ability to evaluate historical information, providing a balance of factual knowledge and critical analysis. This course appeals to students who enjoy history and also want to be challenged. AP U.S. History is recommended for students who have a heightened level of interest in U.S. History and are motivated to learn college-level historical thinking skills. Since this is a fast-paced, reading-intensive course, students who wish to join the class should be accustomed to reading lengthy chapters closely. This course is aimed to prepare students to take the AP exam and students will be expected to participate in a rigorous plan of self-study outside of class to adequately prepare for the exam.

AP Microeconomics is a college-level course designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of microeconomics. The course explores how individuals and businesses make decisions regarding the allocation of resources and how these decisions impact markets. Students will analyze economic concepts, theories, charts and data to develop a solid foundation in microeconomic principles. This class appeals to students interested in personal business and finance and in understanding the fundamental principles of microeconomic theory and how individuals and firms make economic decisions.

AP Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to the rich diversity of political life outside the United States. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures; policies; and political, economic, and social challenges of six selected countries: China, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and the United Kingdom. Students compare the effectiveness of approaches to many global issues by examining how different governments solve similar problems. They also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence based arguments. Units focus on the following themes: political systems, regimes, and governments; political institutions; political culture and participation; party and electoral systems and citizen organizations; as well as political and economic changes and development. This course appeals to students interested in politics and who wish to focus on comparing and contrasting different governance structures around the world. Analyzing data to find patterns and trends and draw conclusions, students will work to connect political concepts to real-life situations. This course is aimed to prepare students to take the AP exam and students will be expected to participate in a rigorous plan of self-study outside of class to adequately prepare for the exam.

Queer Histories is a course centering on a social, cultural, and political history of LGBTQIA+ populations from the early modern period to the present, with a special emphasis on communities from the United States while still exploring various regions of the world. Major topics include: the construction of sexualities as a category of the state; the creation of intersectional identities with an eye toward race, ethnicity, and age; and the politics of everyday life as it pertains to the continued living of LGBTQIA+ populations. Major theorists are discussed in tandem with large-scale and granular case studies. Students deepen their understanding of these concepts by engaging in role-plays, flipped classrooms, research papers, and Socratic seminars. Further, they develop their abilities to provide fully rendered critiques of art and media portrayals of queer communities, as well as explore the genre of performance as subversion. The course includes a research project on the topic of a student’s own choosing. Key questions this course grapples with include: how was the modern interpretation of gay, lesbian, trans, and queer people constructed? What political purpose might this creation serve? How do we reimagine current institutions so as to include marginalized voices in major policy decisions? This course appeals to students interested in lesser-known aspects of history as well as those interested in refining high level research skills. This course will benefit students who wish to develop strong critical analysis skills. Their research paper will also be able to serve as a writing sample for future college and internship applications.

Science


This course is a study of fundamental physics concepts, such as measurement, calculation, and graphing in kinematics and dynamics, propagation and conservation of energy and momentum, gravitation and circular motion, waves, sound, light and electromagnetic phenomena. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of mathematical, analytical, data acquisition, graphical, and communication skills as well as interdisciplinary approaches to discovery. This course serves as a foundational course to upper-level science classes. Concepts and skills are reinforced by a strong emphasis on the modeling/learning cycle, hands-on laboratory experiences, and the integration of other disciplines of science. This course appeals to students who want to develop their reasoning and problem- solving skills which will include, but not exceed, Algebra I concepts. Applications to society, individuals, and the utilization of technology are included.

In this course students acquire a detailed understanding of the chemical processes within living systems using scientific inquiry and analysis. Students understand how the concepts of thermodynamics act on a molecular level to drive all life activities. Laboratory investigations allow students to ask questions, plan and carry out investigations, analyze and interpret data, form arguments from evidence and discuss scientific concepts. The main content areas of focus are enzymes, nucleic acids, bio signaling, and metabolism. Students will advance their abilities of reading, planning, analysis, and construction through lab reports, primary literature examination, and individual research projects. The goal of this course is to demonstrate scientific knowledge using inquiry and analysis. This course appeals to students interested in exploring the relationship between Biology and Chemistry through a project-based learning model and hands-on laboratory experience. Additionally, this course is suggested for students pursuing AP Chemistry, AP Biology, or Advanced Studies classes in science.

This course is designed to provide an introductory overview of the foundational concepts of study of life and living organisms. Students develop understanding of laboratory techniques and inquiry skills through various laboratory investigations and research projects. Students are exposed to biology topics such as biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and ecology. This course appeals to students interested in developing their understanding of the world around them while honing the critical thinking and inquiry skills of a scientist. Further, this course serves as a required or recommended pre-requisite for advanced courses in the science department including AP Biology, AP Environmental Science, and other Advanced Studies courses.

This course introduces the basic principles of chemistry. Students gain experience using facts, graphs, data tables, concepts and math skills in problem solving situations. Basic laboratory skills are developed along with chemical literacy. The student will be exposed to atomic and molecular structures, phases of matter, atomic structure and periodic properties, energy of chemical and nuclear reactions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium reactions, solubility, electrochemical cells, and organic chemistry. This course appeals to students interested in a project-based learning model and hands-on laboratory experience. Additionally, this course is suggested for students pursuing AP Chemistry, AP Biology or Advanced Studies classes in science.

Physics is a one-year laboratory intensive course devoted to the study of motion and forces, energy and momentum, thermodynamics, and electricity and magnetism. Physics is meant to foster a greater understanding of the students’ world around them. It is meant to develop their appreciation of phenomena not only through their observation, but quantification of real-world experiences. Moreover, the value of scientific processes and practices are acquired through learning new methods of inquiry and powerful critical thinking skills. The students have the opportunity to acquire the concepts, knowledge, and skills through handson activities, laboratory practices, and science demonstrations. Most of the labs and classroom activities involve algebraic equations as well as some other mathematical calculations. Finally, this course seeks to connect science with its real-world purpose. This course appeals to students interested in engineering, technical, or medical professions. Physics provides students with an opportunity to explore natural phenomenon through the application of scientific principles, mathematical models, and scientific inquiry. By utilizing demonstration, laboratory, and other learning activities and experiences, students will gain an understanding of major concepts in physics.

AP Physics C: Mechanics and Electricity & Magnetism is a year-long, calculus-based, college- level physics course taken concurrently with AP Calculus BC (recommended) or AP Calculus AB. Students have the opportunity to delve deep into conceptualized knowledge of mechanics, as well as waves and optics, relativity, and electricity and magnetism. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through classroom study and activities as well as hands-on laboratory work as they explore concepts like change, force interactions, fields, and conservation. This course appeals to students who are planning to specialize or major in one of the physical sciences or engineering and who seek to further their foundation for a science.

Advanced Placement (AP) Biology is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the study of life and living organisms, with an emphasis on depth and complexity of topics beyond the high school level. Students develop their critical thinking and inquiry skills through laboratory investigations, research projects, and analysis of scientific literature. The course covers topics such as biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and ecology. This course appeals to students interested in pursuing college study or a career in a scientific field (ex. pre-med) upon completing their high school diploma program in Pasadena.

Advanced Placement Chemistry is a second-year high school course and is designed to be the equivalent of a general college chemistry course. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based lab investigations as they explore the four Big Ideas: scale, proportion, and quantity; structure and properties of substances; transformations; and energy. Students find this course both challenging and enlightening. As we work through the material it is important that students view chemistry as being more than atoms, molecules, and reaction. Throughout the year students are asked to solve many problems, think creatively, and work both independently and as a team. This course appeals to students interested in furthering their foundation for a science career.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of environmental science, including the study of ecological systems, natural resource management, and the impact of human activities on the environment. Students develop their critical thinking and analytical skills through laboratory investigations, field studies, case studies, and research projects. The course covers topics such as ecosystems, biodiversity, pollution, climate change, energy, sustainability, and environmental justice. This course appeals to students interested in deeper exploration of environmental issues and applying scientific understanding to complex social and political issues. Students passionate about the environment, advocacy, or trans-disciplinary thinking should consider this course.

Organic Chemistry focuses on integration of chemical principles to the rich chemistry of carbon and carbon-based compounds. The class teaches chemical principles as it relates to organic chemistry and delves into the chemistry of various functional groups (hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amines) as well as standard laboratory techniques (such as separation, purification, and synthesis) and analytical techniques such as spectroscopy. The emphasis in the course is on the comprehension of the concepts behind fundamental organic reaction mechanisms, energy changes involved in organic reactions, and synthesis of simple organic compounds. Interwoven throughout the course, the students have multiple opportunities to further hone the idea of the scientific method, concept of error, importance of reproducibility of results, and the proposition of viable hypotheses, in line with the scientific practices in the Next Generation Science Standards. This course appeals to students interested in pursuing pre-med as a major in college and/or interested in a hands-on approach to chemistry. Organic Chemistry is typically a sophomore level course in college. Exposure to the material in high school will help students prepare for this difficult college course.

Anatomy is a one semester course that involves the structure and includes learning of the functions of the human body, as it pertains to how the body systems relate to one another in organization, adaptation, and homeostasis. This course will involve laboratory activities, projects, dissections, textbook material, models, diagrams, journal writings, and clinical studies. The material learned in this course can be applied to medical field careers, health and fitness careers, and biological research careers. This course appeals to a wide range of individuals who have an interest in understanding the structure and functions of the human body, as well as how different body systems relate to each other in terms of organization, adaptation, and maintaining homeostasis.

Computer Science & Technology


This is an introductory course in which students develop their foundational skills in technology that are critical to their success at EF Academy, in their university education, and in their professional career. At the end of this course, students will have mastered basic technology skills, gained experience applying those skills, and expanded their knowledge of established information communications technology and computer science. This course appeals to all students who have an interest in and desire to explore information and communication systems, computer science, and technology.

This course introduces students to foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. AP- CSP is designed to attract all students - especially those who are traditionally underrepresented in computer science - to engage them with essential computing tools and multidisciplinary learning experiences. Students participating in AP-CSP have opportunities to develop their leadership skills in technology through “real-world” situations. Students enrolling in AP-CSP at this level should meet the prerequisites of strong command of English reading and writing. This course appeals to students interested in applying ICT/CS skills to solving real-world challenges.

ICT/CS Capstone is a course that is occupationally specific and designed to further develop the student’s necessary and required academic, technical, and career readiness skills needed to transition successfully to postsecondary education and employment. In collaboration with their educators, students develop an individualized program of study at the beginning of the academic year. Possible areas of focus include, yet are not limited to: cybersecurity, database management, data science, digital design, information support and services, network systems, programming and software development, and web design/development. This course appeals to students who are ready to choose their own course of study and develop specialized information technology and computer science skills while building a portfolio of projects which demonstrate their readiness to perform in either a professional or post-secondary level.

Mathematics


Integrated Math 1 is the first course of a three-course accelerated sequence including Integrated Math 1, Integrated Math 2, and Integrated Math 3 that prepares students to take AP Calculus at its conclusion. The Integrated Math series covers all content traditionally taught in Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, and Precalculus. Each course in this series offers students a “big picture” understanding of mathematics. This includes understanding how the different areas of mathematics are related, and how math makes sense, is relevant, and is useful in understanding the real world. Students are then able to become critical thinkers and gain the tools necessary in any field that requires problem solving. Students completing this course are proficient in communicating mathematics both verbally and symbolically. They understand the whys of the mathematics they are doing and are able to perform all levels of skill-based mathematics including manipulating algebraic expressions, using algorithms, and performing basic computations. Integrated Math 1 builds and strengthens students’ conceptual knowledge of functions, linear functions, equations, inequalities, sequences, basic exponential functions, systems of linear equations, systems of linear inequalities, quadratic functions, one variable descriptive statistics, correlation and residuals, analyzing categorical data, mathematical modeling, and both coordinate and transformational geometries. This course appeals to students interested in building their mathematical analysis and application skills to solve real world problems on a pathway toward AP math courses.

Integrated Math 2 is the second course of a three-course accelerated sequence including Integrated Math 1, Integrated Math 2, and Integrated Math 3 that prepares students to take AP Calculus at its conclusion. The Integrated Math series covers all content traditionally taught in Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, and Precalculus. Each course in this series offers students a “big picture” understanding of mathematics. This includes understanding how the different areas of mathematics are related, and how math makes sense, is relevant, and is useful in understanding the real world. Students are then able to become critical thinkers and gain the tools necessary in any field that requires problem solving. Students completing this course are proficient in communicating mathematics both verbally and symbolically. They understand the whys of the mathematics they are doing and are able to perform all levels of skill-based mathematics including manipulating algebraic expressions, using algorithms, and performing basic computations. Integrated Math 2 builds and strengthens students’ conceptual knowledge of functions, absolute value functions and inequalities, systems of linear and non-linear equations and inequalities, quadratic functions, matrices, probability, decision making based on probabilities, mathematical modeling, geometric proof, similarity, transformations, and trigonometry. This course appeals to students interested in building their mathematical analysis and application skills to solve real world problems on a pathway toward AP math courses.

Integrated Math 3 is the third course of a three-course accelerated sequence including Integrated Math 1, Integrated Math 2, and Integrated Math 3 that prepares students to take AP Calculus at its conclusion. The Integrated Math series covers all content traditionally taught in Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, and Precalculus. Each course in this series offers students a “big picture” understanding of mathematics. This includes understanding how the different areas of mathematics are related, and how math makes sense, is relevant, and is useful in understanding the real world. Students are then able to become critical thinkers and gain the tools necessary in any field that requires problem solving. Students completing this course are proficient in communicating mathematics both verbally and symbolically. They understand the whys of the mathematics they are doing and are able to perform all levels of skill-based mathematics including manipulating algebraic expressions, using algorithms, and performing basic computations. In Integrated Math 3, several big ideas are interwoven, including: functions (e.g., inverse, composite, piecewise, parametric), trigonometry, polar coordinates, modeling, and algebraic manipulation. Students engage with an introduction to several calculus topics, including limits, area under a curve, and rates of change. On a daily basis, students work collaboratively with others as they use problem-solving strategies, complete investigations, gather evidence, critically analyze results, and communicate clear and effective arguments while justifying their thinking. This course appeals to students interested in building their mathematical analysis and application skills to solve real world problems on a pathway toward AP math courses.

AP Statistics is an introductory college-level statistics course that introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students cultivate their understanding of statistics using technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they explore concepts like variation and distribution; patterns and uncertainty; and data-based predictions, decisions, and conclusions. This course appeals to students who have completed Integrated Math 1, 2, and 3 and are interested in studying an AP level math course other than AP Calculus with many real-world applications.

AP Calculus AB is an introductory college-level calculus course. Students cultivate their understanding of differential and integral calculus through engaging with real-world problems represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally and using definitions and theorems to build arguments and justify conclusions as they explore concepts like change, limits, and the analysis of functions. Key topics covered are the existence of limits, differentiation techniques, optimization, related rates, integration techniques, and differential equations. AP Calculus AB covers content taught in the first semester of calculus at the university level. This course appeals to students who have completed the Integrated Math series and are interested in advanced mathematic studies that will prepare them for a rigorous STEM pathway in college.

AP Calculus BC is an introductory college-level calculus course. Students cultivate their understanding of differential and integral calculus through engaging with real-world problems represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally and using definitions and theorems to build arguments and justify conclusions as they explore concepts like change, limits, and the analysis of functions. Key topics covered are the existence of limits, differentiation techniques, optimization, related rates, integration techniques, differential equations, sequences and the convergence of series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. AP Calculus BC covers content taught in the first two semesters of calculus at the university level. AP Calculus BC is a fast-paced and challenging course that appeals to students who have completed the Integrated Math series and are interested in advanced mathematic studies that will prepare them for a rigorous STEM pathway in college. Note: AP Calculus BC covers all topics contained in AP Calculus AB plus additional content.

This course introduces students to non-Euclidean Geometry, tensor analysis, differential forms, and the essentials of Einstein’s theory of General Relativity. Key topics covered are the proof of the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem, construction of a metric, extrinsic versus intrinsic curvature, the Levi-Civita connection, the Riemann curvature tensor versus the Ricci tensor, the calculation of geodesics, and the Schwarzschild solution to the Einstein Equation. Advanced Studies in Differential Geometry appeals to students who have completed either AP Calculus AB or BC and are looking to take a college level course applying calculus concepts to geometric topics.

Business and Personal Finance focuses on preparing students with the financial life skills necessary to navigate the world and empower them to make educated financial decisions. This class provides a foundational understanding of banking, loans, credit, credit cards, interest, investing, retirement and estate planning, taxes, and budgeting. This course appeals to students who would like to learn the skills necessary to navigate financial decisions in an informed and educated way in both the business and personal realms.

Visual Arts


Intro to 2D Arts is an introductory art course open to all students, regardless of previous art experience or ability. This course starts with a study of the language and elements of art, such as line, shape, form, space, color, and texture. The course subsequently explores the principles of design, such as rhythm and movement, balance, proportion, variety, emphasis, and unity. Students develop a variety of drawing, painting, and critical analysis skills. They are given instruction in color theory, shading, perspective, and painting and drawing techniques. Students are also expected to research and learn about artists old and new, and encouraged to attend local museums and art events as they are added to our activities calendar. This course appeals to students who have an interest in 2-dimensional art forms, and primarily traditional mediums. It is an entry-level course open to all students, regardless of previous art experience or ability. It is a prerequisite for the AP Art class open to 11th and 12th grade students.

Drawing and Painting is an intermediate course that explores traditional mediums such as graphite, charcoal, pastels, watercolor, acrylic, and oil paint. Students use their knowledge of the elements and principles of design to further develop their drawing and painting skills, their studies of composition, and learn more about proportion through observational and figure drawing. Students are encouraged to engage with Social Justice through art. This course appeals to students who have previous experience in art and would like to further develop their drawing and painting skills. This course is an excellent choice for sophomores and juniors who would like to hone their skills before creating a portfolio for AP Art.

Intro to 3D Arts is an introductory art course open to all students, regardless of previous art experience or ability. Students in this course hone their 3D visual arts and design skillsets through explorations in three-dimensional space. Applying the elements and principles of art and design while immersed in the design process provides a foundation for student projects in this course. Working from process to product, students realize their creations using techniques and concepts related to 3D design and sculpture. Traditional and emergent technologies and materials support course work, including modeling and sculpting in oilbased clay and Sculpy, modeling and sculpting in 3D CAD software, printing in 3D plastic, using wire, and fabricating in cardboard, along with other foundational 3D techniques and materials. Fabrication and use of maquettes and models help students iterate, evolve, and improve their concepts and craft in each project. Written and visual analysis of historical and contemporary case studies provides context for students to understand and direct their 4 developing visual voices. In the interest of fostering original thought and making, students are given ample opportunities to self-direct their work throughout the year. Drawing connections between 2D and 3D modalities supports coursework investigating themes of abstraction, representation, observation, invention, imagination, space, form-language, form-sense, and architecture and design throughout the year. Visiting local museums and engaging in the broader visual arts community is supported as opportunities arise. This course appeals to students interested in sculpture, architecture and design, visual art, concept design, character design, jewelry design, and games. Intro to 3D Arts is an entry-level course open to all students, regardless of previous art experience or ability. It is a prerequisite for the AP Art class open to 11th and 12th grade students.

Drawing and Painting is an intermediate course that explores traditional mediums such as graphite, charcoal, pastels, watercolor, acrylic, and oil paint. Students use their knowledge of the elements and principles of design to further develop their drawing and painting skills, their studies of composition, and learn more about proportion through observational and figure drawing. Students are encouraged to engage with Social Justice through art. This course appeals to students who have previous experience in art and would like to further develop their drawing and painting skills. This course is an excellent choice for sophomores and juniors who would like to hone their skills before creating a portfolio for AP Art.

AP Art allows students to prepare portfolios in alignment to their choice of AP Art offerings, including: AP 2-D Art and Design, AP 3-D Art and Design, AP Drawing. Students investigate different materials, processes, and techniques. Using this research, they create a portfolio consisting of at least five finished pieces that are all connected to a theme, in addition to a number of other artworks that explore different mediums and techniques and show diverse ideas. Using knowledge of the elements and principles of design, students also communicate their ideas about their artwork and the work of others. Students engage in class critiques and exhibit their work. This course appeals to students who would like to investigate, communicate, and create in order to deepen their understanding of art and create a portfolio for college. Portfolios can be used to apply for scholarships and are sometimes necessary when applying for Arts- 5 focused colleges or programs. Students may also elect to submit their portfolio for college credits at the end of the school year in May (rather than taking a written exam). A completed portfolio should demonstrate a sophisticated and advanced level of creativity and mastery of technique. A score of 3, 4, or 5 is considered “passing” and the student will gain college credit in Visual Art or Humanities at many colleges and universities.

Performing Arts


Beginning Instrumental Music is a class for students with limited or no prior experience in instrumental or vocal music. Students may participate on keyboard, guitar, woodwind, brass, percussion instruments, or voice. Percussionists will learn both pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments. Music fundamentals, including proper playing technique, reading, and notation are core components. This course appeals to students interested in discovering and developing skills in instrumental or vocal music. Formal experience playing in an ensemble is not required.

The major emphasis of this course is to develop student achievement through the study of instrumental music. This may include band and orchestral music, chamber music, and other forms including modern, popular music. Student-musicians develop the ability to perform individually and in an ensemble with considerable skill, accuracy, and aesthetic sensitivity. Students will complete an interest and ability questionnaire in order to be assigned to the ensemble best suited to the student’s skill. An audition may also be required. Students can expect to maintain a practice schedule throughout the school year. This course appeals to experienced musicians and students eager to develop as musicians in collaboration with their peers. Formal experience playing in an ensemble is helpful but not required.

Intro to Drama & Storytelling is a survey course that introduces students to the conventions of both performance and theater. Students learn the vocabulary and implement the concepts that inform narrative structure and dramatic writing by performing personal stories, monologues, and scenes. A historically significant play is studied at length to deepen appreciation and recognition of the unique story-telling features of dramatic literature. The year culminates with students writing and directing their own scenes. This activity-oriented course appeals to students who want to explore and cultivate performative and written expression. Designed for students with little or no experience, this course provides a warm and safe environment for our Pasadena students to explore their own story-telling capability.  

In Advanced Studies: Drama & Video Production, students extend their knowledge of narrative structure and story from Intro to Drama into the world of the moving image. During the first semester, students learn the basics of the moving image starting with the first films from the turn of the 20th century to contemporary digital filmmaking. Students explore the major theories surrounding the moving image and develop a vocabulary by which to describe cinematic compositions. Second semester includes a variety of project-based assignments using simple cameras, lenses, and editing software (traditional, stop-action, and/or animation), through which students will develop their own filmmaking and story-telling style. The summative for this class is a short film written, edited, and filmed by individual students. This course appeals to students interested in various aspects of filmmaking, including cinematography and editing. The course is an opportunity for students to bring their storytelling and creativity to the screen.

Mandarin


Mandarin 1 is an introduction to Mandarin Chinese. All three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational) are targeted as well as cultural aspects of Mandarin-speaking countries. Students develop functional language ability to meet needs in their personal and academic lives. They learn to speak with sentence-level language, ask and answer basic questions, and handle simple everyday life situations. Activities designed for the course train the four tones, vocabulary, grammatical constructions, and simplified characters in meaningful contexts. Conducted largely in Mandarin, this course uses the Comprehensible Input (CI) method, employing strategies like TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling), fostering a more natural language learning process (e.g. inductive grammar, high-frequency words and structures). Communication is assessed informally and formally through bellwork, writing, authentic materials, and conversation. By the end of this course, students reach the level of novice-mid according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in Mandarin for personal interest, basic intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a Mandarin-speaking region or country. Mandarin 1 is not grade-specific and can be enjoyed as an elective.

Mandarin 2 is a continuation to Mandarin 1. All three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational) are targeted as well as cultural aspects of Mandarin-speaking countries. While many of the linguistic tasks students learn to handle are similar to those of year one, the level of language required to carry out these tasks is higher. This course uses the Comprehensible Input (CI) method, employing strategies like TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling), fostering a more natural language learning process (e.g. inductive grammar, high-frequency words and structures). Taught mostly in Mandarin, this course allows students to comprehend and produce paragraph-level Chinese. Rigorous practice of spoken and written Chinese in communicative activities finetunes pronunciation, expands vocabulary, and internalizes more complex grammatical constructions. Students also read expository writings on a variety of cultural topics. By the end of this course, students reach the level of novice-high or intermediate-low according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in intermediate Mandarin for personal interest, intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a Mandarin-speaking region or country. Mandarin 2 is not grade-specific, can be enjoyed as an elective, but has a prerequisite of Mandarin 1 or the equivalent.

Mandarin 3 continues to dive deeper into the exploration of the Mandarin language. All three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational) are targeted as well as cultural aspects of Mandarin-speaking countries. Linguistic tasks required of students at this level necessitate a basic understanding of Mandarin, including a moderate command of tonal variants and vocabulary at the intermediate-low proficiency level. Taught almost entirely in Mandarin, this course allows students to comprehend and produce paragraph-level Chinese. Rigorous practice of spoken and written Chinese in communicative activities fine-tunes pronunciation, expands vocabulary, and internalizes more complex grammatical constructions. Students also read expository writings on a variety of cultural topics. Course themes include Birthday Party, Seeing A Doctor, Dating, Renting an Apartment, Sports, Travel and At the Airport. Students evidence their proficiency by way of field studies, projects, role-plays, skits, videos, art, dialogues, readings, and oral/written evaluations. By the end of this course, students reach the proficiency level of intermediate-low to intermediate-mid according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in intermediate Mandarin for personal interest, intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a Mandarin-speaking region or country. Mandarin 3 is not gradespecific and can be enjoyed as an elective, but has a prerequisite of Mandarin 2 or the equivalent.

French


French 1 is an introduction to the French language. All three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational) are targeted as well as cultural aspects of French-speaking countries. Students acquire common beginner structures used in everyday life and are able to communicate needs, likes, and dislikes in the present tense. Conducted in French, this course uses the Comprehensible Input (CI) method, employing strategies like TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling), fostering a more natural language learning process (e.g. inductive grammar, high-frequency words and structures). Grammar is further explored during story comprehension exercises. Communication is assessed informally and formally through bellwork, creative writing, authentic materials, and conversation. By the end of this course, students reach the level of novice-mid according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in French or in learning another Romance language for personal interest, basic intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a French-speaking region or country. French 1 is not grade-specific and can be enjoyed as an elective.

French 2 is a continuation of the French language. All three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational) are targeted as well as cultural aspects of French-speaking countries. Students acquire common elementary-to-intermediate structures used in everyday life and are able to recognize and use verbal moods to form basic wishes. 34 Conducted in French, this course uses the Comprehensible Input (CI) method, employing strategies like TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling), fostering a more natural language learning process (e.g. inductive grammar, high-frequency words and structures). Grammar is further explored during story comprehension exercises. Communication is assessed informally and formally through bellwork, creative writing, authentic materials, and conversation. By the end of this course, students reach the level of novice-high to intermediate-low according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in becoming proficient in lower-intermediate French or in learning another Romance language for personal interest, intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a French-speaking region or country. French 2 is not gradespecific, can be enjoyed as an elective, but has a prerequisite of French 1 or the equivalent.

French 3 is a deeper continuation in the French language. All three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational) are targeted as well as many cultural aspects of French-speaking countries. Students acquire common yet more complex structures used in everyday life and are able to use more complicated hypothetical and abstract statements. Conducted in French, this course uses the Comprehensible Input (CI) method, employing strategies like TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling), fostering a more natural language learning process (e.g. inductive grammar, high-frequency words and structures). Grammar is further explored during story comprehension exercises. Communication is assessed informally and formally through bellwork, creative writing, authentic materials, and conversation. Summative assessments include cultural practices and products, collaboration, and linguistic and cultural comparisons to broaden their understanding. By the end of this course, students reach the level of intermediate-mid according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in becoming proficient in mid-intermediate French or in learning another Romance language for personal interest, intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a French-speaking region or country. French 3 is not grade-specific, can be enjoyed as an elective, but has a prerequisite of French 2 or the equivalent.

French 4 is an advanced exploration of the French language and culture. All three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretative, and presentational) are targeted as well as many cultural aspects of French-speaking countries. Students acquire complex structures and are able to use more complicated hypothetical and abstract statements. Conducted in French, this course uses the Comprehensible Input (CI) format, employing strategies like TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling), fostering a more natural language learning process (e.g. inductive grammar, high-frequency words and structures). Content is organized around the six AP (Advanced Placement) themes: beauty and esthetics, contemporary life, family and communities, global challenges, personal and public identities, science and technology. Performance is assessed informally and formally through creative writing, projects, field studies, and conversation. By the end of this course, students reach the level of intermediate-high according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in becoming proficient in intermediate-high French for personal development, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or in future study in a French-speaking country. French 4 is not grade-specific, can be enjoyed as an elective, but has a prerequisite of French 3 or the equivalent.

Spanish


Spanish 1 is an introductory course designed for students with little or no previous study of the Spanish language. This course introduces students to basic language patterns and vocabulary. Repetition and Comprehensible Input (CI) are essential components of this course. Students use culture from the Spanish-speaking world as a vehicle towards proficiency in the interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication. Units are designed to build on one another as students develop their language abilities. Students evidence their proficiency by way of projects, role-plays, skits, videos, art, dialogues, readings, and exams. As students progress through each unit, they leverage previously learned material and are given opportunities to strengthen their use of the language. By the end of this course, students reach the level of novice-mid according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in Spanish or in learning another Romance language for personal interest, basic intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a Spanish-speaking region or country. Spanish 1 is not grade-specific and can be enjoyed as an elective.

Spanish 2 helps students further develop the language acquired in Spanish 1. Students continue to engage in all three modes of communication, with an increased focus on the interpersonal mode. Students advance their ability to negotiate meaning and produce the 37 language. Comprehensible Input (CI) remains the leading methodology in ensuring students acquire the language. Culture continues to be used as a vehicle by which students engage in the interpretive, presentational, and interpersonal modes of communication. Students still evidence their proficiency by way of projects, role-plays, skits, videos, art, dialogues, readings, and exams. Students begin to learn how to engage in the past tense, among other grammatical structures consistent with the novice-high level. By the end of this course, students reach the level of novice-high to intermediate-low according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in becoming proficient in Spanish at the intermediate-low level or in learning another Romance language for personal interest, intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a Spanish-speaking region or country. Spanish 2 is not gradespecific, can be enjoyed as an elective, but has a prerequisite of Spanish 1 or the equivalent.

Spanish 3 builds on the language acquired by students in Spanish 1 and Spanish 2. Students continue to engage in all three modes of communication, with a special emphasis on the interpersonal and presentational. Students continue to use culture as a vehicle to advance proficiency in all modes of communication. Comprehensible Input continues to serve as the leading methodology along with other elements of the multi-modal and communicative approaches. Students continue to evidence their proficiency by way of projects, role-plays, skits, videos, art, dialogues, readings, and exams. Authentic resources such as newspaper articles, TV, film, commercials, books, infographics, and more are incorporated for students to engage with content in the target language in similar ways to a native speaker. Students engage with more advanced grammatical concepts like the subjunctive mood. By the end of this course, students reach the level of intermediate-mid according to the American Council on the Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. This course appeals to any student interested in becoming proficient in Spanish at the intermediate-mid level or in learning another Romance language for personal interest, intercultural communication, future studies in the humanities or international relations, or future employment or travel in a Spanish-speaking region or country. Spanish 3 is not gradespecific, can be enjoyed as an elective, but has a prerequisite of Spanish 2 or the equivalent.

AP Spanish Language and Culture is equivalent to an intermediate level college course in Spanish. Students build on their knowledge of the Spanish language and culture developed in previous courses. Students deepen their understanding of Spanish language and culture by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication to real-life situations as they explore concepts related to family and communities, personal and public identities, beauty and aesthetics, science and technology, contemporary life, and global challenges. The course takes a holistic approach to language proficiency and recognizes the complex interrelatedness of comprehension and comprehensibility, vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. Students learn language structures in context and use them to convey meaning. Students continue to evidence their proficiency by way of field studies, projects, role-plays, skits, videos, art, dialogues, readings, and exams. Authentic resources such as newspaper articles, TV, film, commercials, books, infographics, and more are incorporated for students to engage with content in the target language in similar ways to a native speaker. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course strives to promote both fluency and accuracy in language use and avoid overemphasis on grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. This course appeals to any student interested in becoming proficient in Spanish at the intermediate-high to advanced-low level or in learning another Romance language for personal interest, intercultural communication, future studies in Spanish language or literature, the humanities or international relations, or for future employment or travel in a Spanish-speaking region or country. AP Spanish Language & Culture is not grade- specific and can be enjoyed as an elective, but has a prerequisite of Spanish 3 or the equivalent.

Health & Wellness


This course provides a survey of physical education, which includes the self-assessment of one’s personal fitness levels in relation to a variety of new and familiar activities, games, and sports. An investigation of the role that physical fitness plays within the health and wellness of oneself is at the heart of this course, with an emphasis placed on communication. Throughout this course, we aim to learn more about ourselves and our communities through physical activity. We investigate ways in which to safely engage in physical activity, the benefits of physical activity, and the diversity of physical activity. This course appeals to students interested in understanding the connections between physical fitness and emotional wellness, as well as those who are interested in improving and/or maintaining a healthy and active lifestyle.

Foundations of Health and Wellness offers students the opportunity to explore wellness topics in a thought provoking, activity-based manner. Students understand how physical and emotional health are connected to our overall wellbeing and how to evaluate evidence to support healthy behaviors and lifestyles. Units cover mental, physical, and social health, including topics of mindfulness, nutrition, and healthy habits. This course appeals to students interested in understanding what impacts our emotional wellness, as well as learning and practicing strategies to promote health and happiness.

This course builds upon the Foundations of Health and Wellness course. Topics covered in this course relate to more advanced studies of physical, mental and social health, including topics of substance use and abuse, sexual health and decision-making and dynamics in relationships, as well as mental wellness. Students identify lifestyle changes to enhance lifelong health, identify personal health risks based upon current lifestyle choices, and evaluate evidence to support healthy behaviors and lifestyles. This course appeals to students who have a basic knowledge of health and development topics and want to deepen their understanding of topics of wellness, as well as identify habits and skills that will support strong relationships and sense of self in adulthood.

AP Psychology is an introductory college-level psychology course. Students cultivate their understanding of the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes through inquiry-based investigations as they explore concepts like the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. This course appeals to students interested in topics of human behavior and mental processes, connecting psychological concepts and theories to real-world scenarios, and analyzing and interpreting data. This course is well-suited for students who might be considering courses of study in social sciences at the university level.

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