Design your High School Diploma in New York

Your advisors help you craft your pathway to graduation. Choose classes that are meaningful to you from a wide range of subjects.

High School Diploma at EF Academy New York

You have a variety of courses to choose from, including IB courses and AP courses.

We foster student-centered classes by teaching an inquiry-based curriculum where students explore concepts to demonstrate levels of thinking and understanding that reach beyond learning only content. Through their course of study, students learn not only to question what they are learning, but they learn to examine the value of learning, as well as to analyze and reflect on how--through their learning--they can make a positive and profound impact on their local, national and global community.

EF Academy offers students three personalized pathways to reach graduation; each program has been designed to support students and ensure success in university and career.

This pathway invites students to complete the full IB Diploma Program (DP). EF Academy’s IB Diploma Program is a rigorous academic course of study within a broad and balanced curriculum. The program helps students to flourish physically, intellectually, emotionally, and ethically by challenging them to apply their knowledge and skills in the real-world. The program pushes students outside of their comfort zones and challenges them to think differently, to broaden their perspectives, and to take risks. The Diploma Programme (DP) curriculum is made up of six subject groups and the DP core, comprising theory of knowledge (TOK), creativity, activity, service (CAS), and the extended essay. Through the Diploma Programme (DP) core, students reflect on the nature of knowledge, complete independent research, and undertake a project that often involves community service.

This pathway is a unique combination of our US High School curriculum and the IB Diploma Program and / or Advanced Placement (AP) courses that allows students to pursue advanced coursework in one or more subjects leading to IB and / or AP Certificates. Certificate candidates take courses in their areas of academic interest and, upon completion of these classes, sit for IB or AP examinations. Candidates will receive an IB and / or AP Certificates for each course successfully completed, as well as the US High School Diploma.

The USHS pathway is a broad curriculum for those who have not yet decided on a specific major or career path. The US High School Diploma program has been created for students focusing on developing English proficiency, passing courses with a high GPA, and preparing for the TOEFL/IELTS exams and the SAT.

Course Offerings 2024-2025

English


Throughout this course, students will learn about argumentative writing, rhetoric, and research by considering the different modes of argument that operate in our culture every day. By practicing critical literacy skills using a variety of print and non-print texts, students will become active observers of arguments they encounter on a daily basis. The semester will focus on developing the skills needed to understand, develop, evaluate, research and produce an argument. Students will utilize the lessons they have learned to compose an effective argument, culminating in a major project to assess analysis, research, writing and communication skills. During this process, students will receive direct instruction in the protocols of formal academic research, including: writing with templates/graphic organizers; identifying and avoiding plagiarism; evaluating evidence; developing inquiry; assessing source credibility & relevance; supporting an argument; acknowledging & refuting a counter-argument; and integrating technology skills for research.

This course is an introduction to the art of creative writing. Students will write and revise pieces in a number of genres including personal essays, short stories, poetry, as well as alternative genres. The class will serve as a writing workshop, examining various processes for creating, using mentor texts as inspirations and models, and learning from providing and listening to peer feedback. Students will analyze and evaluate the work of experts in order to apply the strategies in their own writing. They will go through the writing process, of which, reflection will be incredibly important to help determine their knowledge and understanding of the writing craft. Ultimately, students will engage in a supportive creative community that empowers individual curiosity, and artistic risk-taking. Students will be encouraged to contribute their pieces to EF Academy’s Literary Magazine.

This course offers an introduction to the exploration of the diverse and rich world of dramatic literature and theatrical performance. Students engage in an in-depth study of classic and contemporary plays, delving into the intricacies of character development, plot structure, and thematic elements. Through both theoretical and practical components, students develop their understanding of dramatic conventions, theatrical techniques, and the cultural significance of various dramatic works. The course encourages students to critically analyze the language of the work and actual performances of it, fostering an appreciation for the art of storytelling through the medium of drama. 

Throughout the course, students will examine the multifaceted world of visual storytelling. Through the analysis of diverse visual texts, including graphic novels, advertisements, films, and other multimedia forms, students develop critical literacy skills that extend beyond traditional written texts. This course delves into the unique language of visuals, teaching students to decode imagery, understand visual rhetoric, and appreciate the nuanced interplay of visuals and text. Students engage in discussions about the cultural and societal impact of visual communication, exploring how visuals shape narratives and convey complex messages. Practical components of the course involve creating and interpreting visual texts, allowing students to express themselves creatively and communicate effectively in various media. By the end of the course, students become critical consumers of the world around them, gaining a heightened awareness of the power of visual communication and its role in shaping perspectives and narratives in our visually-driven world.

Throughout this course, students will learn about argumentative writing, rhetoric, and research by considering the different modes of argument that operate in our culture every day. They will also learn about college and career readiness by learning about the university application processes. By practicing critical literacy skills using a variety of print and non-print texts, students will become active observers of arguments they encounter on a daily basis. The semester will focus on developing the skills needed to understand, develop, evaluate, research and produce an argument. Students will utilize the lessons they have learned to compose an effective argument, culminating in a formal essay to assess analysis, research, writing and communication skills. During this process, students will receive direct instruction in the protocols of formal academic research, including: writing with templates/graphic organizers; identifying and avoiding plagiarism; evaluating evidence; developing inquiry; assessing source credibility & relevance; supporting an argument; acknowledging & refuting a counter-argument; and integrating technology skills for research.

Throughout this course, full IB students will learn about argumentative writing, rhetoric, and research by considering the different modes of argument that operate in our culture every day. They will also learn about the IB CORE. By practicing critical literacy skills using a variety of print and non-print texts, students will become active observers of arguments they encounter on a daily basis. Students will utilize the lessons they have learned to compose an effective argument, culminating in their extended essay to assess analysis, research, writing and communication skills. During this process, students will receive direct instruction in the protocols of formal academic research, including: writing with templates/graphic organizers; identifying and avoiding plagiarism; evaluating evidence; developing inquiry; assessing source credibility & relevance; supporting an argument; acknowledging & refuting a counter-argument; and integrating technology skills for research.

This course is an introduction to the art of creative writing. Students will write and revise pieces in a number of genres including personal essays, short stories, poetry, memoirs, as well as alternative genres. The class will serve as a writing workshop, examining various processes for creating, using mentor texts as inspirations and models, and learning from providing and listening to peer feedback. Students will analyze and evaluate the work of experts in order to apply the strategies in their own writing. They will go through the writing process, of which, reflection will be incredibly important to help determine their knowledge and understanding of the writing craft. Ultimately, students will engage in a supportive creative community that empowers individual curiosity, and artistic risk-taking. Students will be encouraged to contribute their pieces to EF Academy’s Literary Magazine.

In this course, students will explore the dynamic intersection between two powerful storytelling mediums: film and literature. Through the lens of cinematic adaptations, students analyze the intricate relationship between literature and film, examining how narrative elements are translated from page to screen. The course delves into classic and contemporary works, fostering a nuanced understanding of storytelling techniques across both mediums. Students engage in critical discussions about the choices filmmakers make in adapting literature, considering the impact on character development, plot structure, and thematic interpretation. Practical elements of the course include the exploration of film language, visual storytelling, and cinematic techniques, allowing students to develop a keen eye for the artistic and technical aspects of filmmaking. This interdisciplinary approach encourages students to appreciate the unique qualities of literature and film while gaining insights into the transformative nature of storytelling across different modes of expression.

This course immerses students in the profound and diverse realm of poetic expression, fostering a deep appreciation for the art of language and literary craftsmanship. Through an exploration of classic and contemporary poems from various cultures and traditions, students delve into the nuances of poetic forms, styles, and thematic elements. The course aims to enhance students' analytical and interpretive skills as they critically engage with poetic works, unraveling layers of meaning and exploring the impact of poetic devices on the reader's experience. In addition to writing analytically and critically, students will have the opportunity to refine their own poetic voices through creative writing exercises, experimenting with different forms and styles. This course cultivates a lifelong appreciation for the beauty and power of language and form, encouraging students to recognize a poet’s capacity to evoke emotion, provoke thought, and offer unique insights into the human experience.

The one year AP Language and Composition course offers students a comprehensive exploration of rhetoric and language usage at an advanced level. Through a dynamic curriculum, students will enhance their critical reading and writing skills, delving into various genres and rhetorical strategies. The course places a strong emphasis on developing students' ability to analyze and interpret complex texts, as well as to construct effective and persuasive arguments. With a focus on honing written and verbal communication, students will engage in challenging tasks that require them to synthesize information, evaluate perspectives, and articulate their ideas with precision. This course not only prepares students for success in college but also equips them with the essential skills to navigate the complexities of language and rhetoric in the broader world.

In this course, students will study a wide range of literary and non-literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide-ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis among others.

In this two year IB Literature course, students will focus exclusively on global literary texts, adopting a variety of approaches to textual criticism. Students explore the nature of literature, the aesthetic function of literary language and textuality, and the relationship between literature and the world. Our focus will be on preparing for the IB literature exam, some of which will be accomplished in class. However, the ultimate goal of the course is to develop an appreciation of literary works from multiple genres.  In order to effectively analyze and explore texts, the classroom environment will focus on inquiry-based, student-centered discussion.

Our EAL Skills courses center on cultivating English language proficiency across various domains: reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language mechanics. Participants will gain an understanding of grammatical structures for both informal and formal communication, while building academic vocabulary essential for success in diverse disciplines. The curriculum includes instruction on conducting research projects, crafting academic essays, and delivering formal presentations. Students develop an awareness of language as a tool for enhancing their communication skills.

  • Grade 9 -  for students with a CEFR level of A2/B1

  • Grade 10 - for students with a CEFR level of high A2/B1

Our EAL Language & Literature courses center on delving into theme-based topics and concepts, utilizing a rich array of print and media sources, encompassing both literary and non-literary texts. Beyond mere comprehension, students will fine-tune their reading skills, enhancing their ability to critically analyze and evaluate diverse texts. Exploring various genres and styles, students will also expand their vocabulary. Writing exercises tailored for diverse audiences and purposes will further develop organizational skills, word choice, voice, and fluency, while reinforcing proper English language conventions. The overarching objective is to instill a genuine passion for both reading and writing.

  • Grade 9 -  All EAL 9 students will take this course

  • Grade 10 - All EAL 10 students will take this course

This course is tailored to assist students with lower English proficiency in core subjects such as math, science, and humanities. In our commitment to fostering an inclusive environment, we recognize that as students progress in English acquisition, they may still benefit from additional support. During EAL Support, students engage in individual, small group, and one-on-one sessions with an EAL Specialist, focusing on coursework from their core classes. The emphasis lies on developing organizational skills, expanding academic vocabulary, and providing writing support. EAL Specialists collaborate with content teachers to ensure that our EAL students have equal access to the same curriculum as their non-EAL peers.

This 2-year language acquisition course focuses on developing English language skills, as well as supporting critical and creative thinking. Students will explore and respond to a variety of literary works, improve English vocabulary and grammar, and adopt the IB learner profile traits.  In English B, students will learn and use a wide range of reading and writing strategies. We will also focus on strengthening communication and listening skills through speaking and listening activities and projects. This is primarily a student-centered course, so students are expected to participate in classroom discussions, as well as independent and collaborative assignments.  In addition to inspiring you to become lifelong learners, the IBDP English B program is designed to prepare you for the IB English B examination. By constantly engaging in valuable and challenging learning experiences, students will not only be preparing for the IB examination, but also for the rigorous demands of a university, as well as future careers.

Humanities


Ancient Civilizations is a US high school humanities course designed in collaboration with the EAL department for English learners at the upper-beginner and lower-intermediate levels. Students will engage with rich content about the development of early humans, the Agricultural Revolution, and civilizations in Mesopotamia, Africa, India, China, and the Mediterranean. Students will develop skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening in a supportive environment that is tailored to meet their individual needs, while challenging them to expand their usage of academic English.

US History is a US High School humanities course designed for intermediate and advanced English language learners. The course focuses on significant social, historical, geographical and cultural topics. Students study the history of the United States from the arrival of the first humans in North America to the American Civil War. The course requires students to engage with and evaluate a variety of sources to deepen their understanding of the course content. Throughout the course students will develop their skills in reading, analyzing, writing about, and discussing different types of historical documents and content.

This course will focus on U.S. history after the American Civil War (1865 to present). Students will use both primary and secondary sources to understand multiple perspectives on and interpretations of various issues and form their own conclusions. They will apply this knowledge of the past to their understanding of the United States today. The purpose of this class is to give students a foundation of U.S. history which they can use to better connect with and comprehend the country in which they are living. In doing so, students will also explore the United States within a global context, examining the impact of international movements and events on the U.S. and vice versa. This class is also designed to give students the skills to think critically about both the past and the present, preparing them to interact with the broader world and continue deeper studies of the social sciences in college.

Throughout the course, students will develop an intercultural understanding and explore a variety of global issues from personal, local, national and global perspectives. Students are encouraged to reflect on how key global issues impact their lives as well as the lives of others in today’s world. Students will study a range of topics, including language & communication, conflict & peace, belief systems, tradition, culture and identity, as well as other topics that have a global significance. Students will develop and use interdisciplinary skills, such as planning, synthesis, research, evaluation, collaboration, communication and critical thinking. By the end of the academic year, students will complete two individual research projects based on two topics of their choice, a group research project where students collaborate in the research process and reflect on what they learned about cross-cultural collaboration, and respond to essential questions based on their knowledge of global issues and perspectives.

This course details the qualities of crafting a strategy for innovative businesses. Attracting consumers in emerging industries will be a central focus of the class, as well as the disruption and displacement that emerging firms create in the marketplace. Also analyzed will be the challenges inherent in introducing innovation to well-entrenched industries.  Classic and contemporary theories and cases will be used to address these and related questions. At the culmination of the course, theoretical concepts will be put to practical use through a group-based final project.

The course examines the creation and management of start-up businesses. It will delve into initial strategy, location, financing, staffing, daily activities, and taxation. The goal of the course will be for students to develop a framework for their own successful start-up business. As such, the course evaluates the necessary qualities and characteristics of the successful entrepreneurial profile. It helps students recognize and determine the steps necessary to design and develop a startup for-profit business and to open and operate a small business enterprise. It describes the basic forms of small business ownership and identifies the necessary financial competencies needed by the entrepreneur.

This course serves as an in-depth introduction to the concepts, principles, problems and applications of marketing. All functional areas and institutions of marketing will be examined, including target marketing and positioning of products and organizations, consumer and organizational markets, product management, pricing, channels of distribution, marketing ethics, promotions, services and international marketing. The 4 P’s of Marketing and & 7 P’s of Service Area Marketing will be critiqued through real-world case studies and analysis of the techniques used by some of the largest and most successful companies in existence. Investigations into Digital Marketing, or the deliverance of advertising through digital channels, will also be performed.  The course will provide students with the opportunity to create a successful online marketing strategy.  Topics included will be Display Advertising, eCommerce Marketing, Content Marketing and Blogging, and Influencer Marketing.

This course explores US history as a means to comprehend its key impacts that influence significant issues affecting America today. The course addresses themes such as States' Rights & Federal Government, Capitalism & Labor, Religion, Race, Political Extremism, and Immigration & Migration. While the primary focus is on the US post-Civil War era, it also delves into Colonial America when necessary for foundational understanding.

Throughout the school year, students will develop key skills, including critical thinking, identifying and understanding perspectives, conducting research, using and evaluating documentary evidence, communicating through written assignments and oral presentations, collaborating, and reflecting for personal growth.

Throughout the DP history course, students have the opportunity to explore historical events that have played a key role in shaping the world today, deepening their understanding of the complex and interconnected nature of past and present events. For example, in year 1 of the class, at an SL level, students will explore the causes and effects of World War I.  They will then venture into depth studies on Japan, Italy and Germany during the interwar years.  From there we will do a deeper analysis of NAZI Germany and the Authoritarian rise of Hitler.  We will end year 1 with the causes and practices of the Second World War. 

In Year 2 of the class, we will examine the Superpower tensions that existed during the Cold War.  We will examine the intricacies of this conflict and how it not only affected the USA and USSR, but also played a major part in the development of countries like Germany, Korea, Vietnam, Egypt and Cuba.  After giving an overview of Cuba we will take a deeper look into the Rise of Fidel Castro and his authoritarian rule. 

At the Higher level students will explore 4 additional units from the lens of: History of the Americas.  They will explore The Great Depression, The Second World War, Civil Rights Movements and end the course with the Cold War. 

Economics is the study of how individuals, businesses, and societies allocate their scarce resources in order to satisfy people’s unlimited wants. Economics uses theoretical models of behavior to predict responses to market and policy changes alongside statistical analysis. This two year course focuses on developing students’ ability to better understand current events by looking at what’s happening in the world around them through an economic lens. In addition to teaching economic terms, diagrams, and theory, the course also heavily focuses on teaching students to write formal pieces of written analysis and evaluation.

 

Year one covers microeconomics and the first half of macroeconomics, up through assessing the causes and effects of economic growth, inflation, unemployment and inequality. This prepares students for further IB study in year two, which focuses on applying  foundational concepts to study aggregate demand and aggregate supply-side intervention, as well as the role of international trade and economic development in the global economy. Students submit their final internal assessment portfolio during the second year, and the course culminates with end-of-the-year external assessment exams.

The 21st century is characterized by rapid change and increasing interconnectedness, impacting individuals and societies in unprecedented ways and creating complex global political challenges. Global politics is an exciting, dynamic subject that draws on a variety of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities, reflecting the complex nature of many contemporary political issues. The study of global politics enables students to critically engage with different and new perspectives and approaches to politics in order to comprehend the challenges of the changing world and become aware of their role in it as active global citizens.

The Diploma Programme Global Politics course explores fundamental political concepts such as power, equality, sustainability and peace in a range of contexts. It allows students to develop an understanding of the local, national, international and global dimensions of political activity and processes, as well as to explore political issues affecting their own lives. The course helps students to understand abstract political concepts by grounding them in real-world examples and case studies. It also invites comparison between such examples and case studies to ensure a wider and transnational perspective.

In AP U.S. History, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change. The course also provides eight themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: American and national identity; work, exchange, and technology; geography and the environment; migration and settlement; politics and power; America in the world; American and regional culture; and social structures.

AP Psychology is a college level course designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes.  Students will learn about psychologists and studies that have shaped the field as well as explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena of topics such as the biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, psychological disorders and social psychology.Throughout the course, students will apply psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use scientific methods, evaluate claims and evidence and effectively communicate ideas.  This course is the equivalent of Introduction to Psychology (Psychology 101) taken at university. 

AP Comparative Government and Politics is a college level course designed to allow students to practice skills used by comparative political scientists by studying data, political writings from the course countries, and the processes and outcomes of politics in our course country settings.  Students study six course countries; China, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia and the United Kingdom.  This study is accomplished through five practices; concept application, country comparison, data analysis, source analysis and argumentation as well as through five different themes or units; Political systems, regimes and governments, political institutions, political culture and participation, party and electoral systems and citizen organizations,  and political and economic changes and development.  This is mainly a contemporary course comparing our course countries today but also briefly looking at their pasts to understand their presents and futures.  Current events are very important in this course.

Science


Combined Science is an introductory science course geared towards EAL learners. The course focuses on building essential knowledge of the basic concepts of Matter and Energy, developing key to understandings for further study of all three disciplines: physics, chemistry and biology. The study of matter includes the structure of the atom, phases of matter and phase changes. The study of energy includes defining energy, work and force, forms of energy, conservation of energy, energy transfers and alternative energy choices. Throughout the course, science specific vocabulary is emphasized along with the process of experimental design. MYP standards are the basis for assessment in the course.

This Biology course is designed to give students the opportunity to gain an overall understanding of the diversity and complexity of life, enabling them to learn to appreciate its value. Biology is related to many aspects of everyday life, whether we are talking about processes in the human body, new discoveries in medicine, biotechnologies or the changing environment. The course focuses on the life processes that occur within the cell, the anatomy (the structure) and physiology (the processes) of complex multicellular organisms, and the ways by which life forms reproduce, develop, and adapt to conditions in their environment. A great emphasis is put on the structure and the processes in the human body, healthy lifestyle and diseases. The students will have a chance to learn about the past and also recent discoveries and how they affect their lives. The course is practical-oriented and helps to develop skills which are important not just for scientific experiments but useful in everyday life, like an ability to plan work, communicate ideas, and evaluate decisions.

Students will work toward a comprehensive understanding of chemistry. This foundation will include the central concepts of atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, reaction stoichiometry, states of matter, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and electrochemistry. In addition, the Chemistry curriculum includes enriched topics of organic, biological, environmental, industrial and analytical chemistry not  typically covered in a first year chemistry course. Students will develop sophisticated problem solving strategies and fundamental laboratory skills. Emphasis will be placed upon independent investigation and thoughtful scientific research.

Physics is a comprehensive introductory course to the scientific study of matter, energy, force, and motion, and the way they relate to each other. This course covers all the traditional areas of a first course in physics as well as extending into new areas. The specific topics covered are measurement, speed velocity and acceleration, density, forces, energy, work, power, thermal physics, properties of waves, electricity, magnetism, and atomic physics. Along with the theoretical section of the course, there is a strong practical aspect. Experimentation is a major part of the subject and occurs throughout the year. Students will learn essential skills as well as acquiring the ability to plan, execute, and evaluate experiments.

This course combines traditional computer science skills with design technology. Computer science requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking, as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate. Design technology aims to develop a high level of design literacy by enabling students to develop critical thinking and design skills, which they can apply in a practical context. Applications include coding, programming and web design.

This one-semester course allows students to learn through hands-on robotics activities such as assembling a basic mobile robot, and exciting simple yet exciting robotics projects. Students will be able to understand the basics of robotics, algorithms, etc with the help of these wide varieties of hands-on activities. Apart from the aforementioned learning outcomes, this STEM curriculum will also help them develop important skills such as problem-solving, attention to detail, patience, and debugging.

The IB Diploma Program biology standard level course covers the relationship of structure and function at all levels of complexity. Students learn about cell theory, the chemistry of living things, plant structure and growth, and the difference between genes and alleles, among many other topics, to further their understanding of and learning about biology. Throughout this challenging course, students become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. Further, students enjoy multiple opportunities for scientific study and creative inquiry within a global context.

The IB Diploma Programme biology higher level course covers the relationship of structure and function at all levels of complexity. Students learn about cell theory, the chemistry of living things, plant science and genetics, among many other topics to further their understanding of and learning about biology. Throughout this challenging course, students become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. Further, students enjoy multiple opportunities for scientific study and creative inquiry within a global context.

The Physics SL course is possible with no prior knowledge but requires a strong background in Mathematics. It is an advantage to have 1/2 years of previous Physics classes to prepare students for the course. Most of the fundamental aspects of Physics are covered starting with Newton’s Laws and working through Thermodynamics, Electricity, Waves, Modern Physics and the physics of climate change. Students also study an option topic in more depth. This will be either Relativity or Astrophysics, at the teacher’s discretion.

The Physics Higher Level course exposes students to this most fundamental experimental science, which seeks to explain the universe itself from the very smallest particles to the vast distances between galaxies. Students develop traditional practical skills and techniques and increase facility in the use of mathematics, the language of physics. They also develop interpersonal skills as well as information and communication technology skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavors and are important life-enhancing, transferable skills in their own right. Students, moreover, study the impact of physics on society, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the social, economic and environmental implications of the work of physicists. Throughout this challenging course, students become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. Further, students enjoy multiple opportunities for scientific study and creative inquiry within a global context.

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through classroom study, in-class activity, and hands-on, inquiry-based laboratory work as they explore concepts like systems, fields, force interactions, change, and conservation. 

This course requires that twenty-five percent of instructional time will be spent in hands-on laboratory work, with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations that provide students with opportunities to demonstrate the foundational physics principles and apply the science practices.

The Foundations of this course are broken down into three concepts, Perspectives, Systems and Sustainability. The Perspectives topic contains a little of Environmental value systems but is largely rewritten to focus on perspectives, worldviews, values and the development of the environmental movement with a more robust requirement to look at multiple influences. The new Systems subtopic investigates tipping points and emergent properties. The course provided supplemental information on complexity theory for those who are interested in these big ideas.

 

During the course, students will study seven different topics which provide students with the opportunity to evaluate relationships between human societies and the natural world. Topics studied include Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation, Water, Land, Atmosphere and Climate change, Natural Resources and Management, and Human Populations and Urban systems. 

The most important aspect of the ESS course is hands-on work in the laboratory and/or out in the field. Students will access much of the curriculum through project-based learning and international case studies.

Through the HL lens, Environmental justice is introduced and is embedded throughout the course. A wider range of methods to measure and monitor sustainability are included such as biocapacity, carbon and water footprints, the SDGs and planetary boundaries. Doughnut economics and circular economic models are introduced and evaluated. These are also embedded throughout the course.

 

In addition to the seven SL topics, students will study an additional three topics. First, Environmental Law considers how environmental law is constructed, the idea of constitutionalism, the scope and scale of these laws, International law, courts and tribunals, and how the law works with sustainable management of resources. Second, Environmental Economics compares traditional economics, markets and measures of growth with environmental and ecological economics. It considers how we can place value on nature, the possibilities of de-growth and circular and doughnut economic models. Third, Environmental Ethics considers what ethics is and ethical frameworks, the concept of ethical value and moral standing, approaches to ethics, the appeal to nature fallacy and how environmental and social justice movements are converging on common ground. Not unlike the SL course, this course also requires hands-on work in the laboratory and/or out in the field. Students will access much of the curriculum through project-based learning and international case studies.

This course offers an in depth look at many areas of chemistry, including inorganic, organic, electrochemistry, energetics, kinetics, equilibrium and biochemistry, covered during 110 hours of theoretical studies in 2 years. Students will have the opportunity to learn basic chemistry and build on those concepts throughout the course to explain more complicated concepts.

As part of the IB Chemistry program, students will participate in laboratory experimental work in various areas of the curriculum. HL students must complete 40 hours of lab studies. Evidence of this laboratory work is sent to the IB examiners in the second year of the course. Students will also be writing a formal lab report that will be used to determine the portion of their IB grade for this course.

 

All students involved in IB Sciences will participate in the Group IV project. This project allows students to investigate scientific problems from many scientific perspectives and address the local and global significance of them. 

This course offers an in depth look at many areas of chemistry, including inorganic, organic, electrochemistry, energetics, kinetics, equilibrium and biochemistry, covered during 180 hours of theoretical studies in 2 years. Students will have the opportunity to learn basic chemistry and build on those concepts throughout the course to explain more complicated concepts.

As part of the IB Chemistry program, students will participate in laboratory experimental work in various areas of the curriculum. HL students must complete 60 hours of lab studies. Evidence of this laboratory work is sent to the IB examiners in the second year of the course.  Students will also be writing a formal lab report that will be used to determine the portion of their IB grade for this course.

 

All students involved in IB Sciences will participate in the Group IV project.  This project allows students to investigate scientific problems from many scientific perspectives and address the local and global significance of them.

The study of marine science lends itself very well to hands-on work and consequently will be carried out in the estuaries of the Hudson River and Jamaica Bay. There will be many opportunities for practical work both in the field and in the laboratory. In addition, physical oceanography lends itself to the use of ocean modeling and analysis of satellite imagery which may be studied anywhere. In all practical work, students are encouraged to develop an appreciation for the question, How do we know what is true? This question invites an essential of experimental sciences, verification. The technologies used in marine science make these questions especially pertinent.

From the days of the The World Trade Center Disaster to the most recent bombings in New York City, Forensic Science has had to keep pace in a field that is constantly changing and evolving.  This exciting course provides an introduction to the Forensic Sciences. Students do the real work of real forensic scientists making what they do in class both exciting and authentic. Applications include fingerprinting techniques, blood spatter analysis, and DNA analysis.

This course is a combination of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics.  This course introduces students to the design process and the tools used in the engineering, design, and development. Students will experience first‐hand the activities in which engineers engage throughout the design cycle. Development of design briefs, 3D solid modeling, cooperative design development, ethical considerations of engineering solutions, and developing solutions with real world constraints. Problem‐solving and math as it applies to producing products and services for today’s society are emphasized. And through the proper application of STEAM, Work can be done.

Physical Education & Health


This one-semester course helps students develop social-emotional learning skills, to foster overall health and well-being, positive mental health, and the ability to learn, build resilience, and thrive. 

This course will also allow students to develop an understanding of the factors that contribute to healthy development, a sense of personal responsibility for lifelong health, and a respect for their own health in relation to others and the world around them.

This one-semester course helps students develop the strength and conditioning competence needed to participate in physical activities through the development of movement, strength and conditioning skills and the related application of movement concepts and movement strategies.

Students will learn how to apply these skills across a variety of physical activities, such as games, gymnastic and dance sequences, and fitness, individual, or recreational activities.

Sport is a curriculum and instruction is designed for delivery within physical education.In this game-based students will develop a good level of competence. 

In the end, will gain more authentic and enjoyable sport experiences than what we typically see in traditional physical education lessons. Sports will include (but not limited to) basketball, volleyball and soccer.

Our Adventure course involves elements that link closely to development of self-reliance and self confidence, personal responsibility, and respect for others as well as the environment. Concepts developed in adventure education include trust, communication and problem solving. 

Specifically, students will have the opportunity to gain skills in orienteering, mountain biking, and rock climbing. The course is also designed to have students understand their role as environmental stewards by designing and participating in local and global campaigns.

Mathematics


This is an introductory level course designed for students who need to improve their basic skills in mathematics. In this course, students will learn about and explore topics including integers, order of operations, algebraic expressions, one and two-step equations, proportions, percents, probability, geometry, and linear equations. Upon successful completion of the Pre-Algebra course, students will advance to Algebra 1 & Geometry.

In this course, students will learn fundamental algebraic skills such as performing operations involving algebraic expressions, expansion and factorization, solving linear equations, graphing linear and quadratic functions. In addition to the algebraic skills, students will explore the geometric topics of right triangles, similarity of geometric figures, surface area, volume, and properties of circles. Upon successful completion of the Pre-Algebra course, students will advance to Algebra 2 & Trigonometry.

This course reviews and deepens understanding of Algebra 1 concepts and covers the more advanced topics of Algebra 2 and Trigonometry. Topics included are relations and functions, quadratic equations, exponents and radicals, complex numbers, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions and some geometry. An emphasis is placed on mathematical modeling and applying skills to solve word problems.

Pre-Calculus weaves together previous study of algebra, geometry, and mathematical functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. Topics include fundamental concepts of Algebra, functions and graphs, polynomials and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, topics in trigonometry, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices and determinants, conic sections and analytic geometry, sequences, induction, probability, and an introduction to Calculus. Proficiency in the use of scientific and graphing calculators is important for achieving success in this course.

Finite Mathematics and Statistics explores topics that are not often seen in high school Mathematics courses, but are very helpful for developing practical problem solving and logical reasoning. Students gain experience in matrix algebra, graph theory, game theory, logic, and financial mathematics before moving into our final unit of Statistics. This course is for non-IB seniors.

According to the College Board, AP Calculus AB is designed to be the equivalent of a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The courses feature a multi representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Exploring connections among these representations builds understanding of how calculus applies limits to develop important ideas, definitions, formulas, and theorems. A sustained emphasis on clear communication of methods, reasoning, justifications, and conclusions is essential. At the end of the course, students will sit for the AP Calculus AB exam.

This course recognizes the increasing role that mathematics and technology play in a diverse range of fields in a data-rich world. As such, it emphasizes the meaning of mathematics in context by focusing on topics that are often used as applications or in mathematical modeling. To give this understanding a firm base, this course also includes topics that are traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course such as calculus and statistics. The course makes extensive use of technology to allow students to explore and construct mathematical models. Mathematics: applications and interpretation will develop mathematical thinking, often in the context of a practical problem and using technology to justify conjectures.

This course recognizes the need for analytical expertise in a world where innovation is increasingly dependent on a deep understanding of mathematics. This course includes topics that are both traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course (for example, functions, trigonometry, calculus) as well as topics that are amenable to investigation, conjecture and proof, for instance the study of sequences and series at both SL and HL, and proof by induction at HL. The course allows the use of technology, as fluency in relevant mathematical software and hand-held technology is important regardless of choice of course. However, Mathematics: analysis and approaches has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments.

Students who choose Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches at SL or HL should be comfortable in the manipulation of algebraic expressions and enjoy the recognition of patterns and understand the mathematical generalization of these patterns.

This course recognizes the need for analytical expertise in a world where innovation is increasingly dependent on a deep understanding of mathematics. This course includes topics that are both traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course (for example, functions, trigonometry, calculus) as well as topics that are amenable to investigation, conjecture and proof, for instance the study of sequences and series at both SL and HL, and proof by induction at HL. The course allows the use of technology, as fluency in relevant mathematical software and hand-held technology is important regardless of choice of course. However, Mathematics: analysis and approaches has a strong emphasis on the ability to construct, communicate and justify correct mathematical arguments.

Students who wish to take Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches at a higher level must have very strong algebraic skills and the ability to understand simple proofs. They will be students who enjoy spending time with problems and get pleasure and satisfaction from solving challenging problems.

Arts


This course is offered in Grades 9 and 10. The Drama class focuses on the multiple areas of theatrical performance and production. Students will learn about performance, staging, devising, directing, designing, technical theater, and the elements of theatrical visual arts. The course will also focus on improving students’ proficiency and self-expression through cooperative and independent activities. Students will learn and use proper diction, vocal delivery, and nonverbal language in a safe and supportive learning environment.

Theater is a dynamic, collaborative, and live art form. It is a practical subject that encourages discovery through experimentation, the taking of risks, and the presentation of ideas to others. It results in the development of both theater and life skills, the building of confidence, creativity, and working collaboratively. The IB Diploma Programme theater course is a multifaceted theater-making course of study. It gives students the opportunity to make theater as creators, designers, directors, and performers. It emphasizes the importance of working both individually and collaboratively as part of an ensemble. It offers the opportunity to engage actively in the creative process, transforming ideas into action as inquisitive and productive artists. Students experience the course from contrasting artistic perspectives. They learn to apply research and theory to inform and contextualize their work. The theater course encourages students to appreciate that through the process of researching, creating, preparing, presenting, and critically reflecting on theater—as participants and audience members—they gain a richer understanding of themselves, their community, and the world. Through the study of theater, students become aware of their own personal and cultural perspectives, developing an appreciation of the diversity of theater practices, their processes, and their modes of presentation. The course enables students to discover and engage with different forms of theater across time, place, and culture and promotes international-mindedness.

The course is designed primarily to English Language Learners and it intends to introduce them to public speaking and debate, and assist in gaining self-confidence while developing formal and informal communications skills. Students will learn organizational and time management processes as well as delivery in a variety of public speaking forums including informal, demonstration, information, persuasive, extemporaneous and impromptu speaking. Students are encouraged to develop their own creativity, imagination, and attitudes as they prepare a variety of oral discourses for specific speaking situations and audiences.

This course is designed to introduce students to musical theater monologues, scenes, solos, and ensembles from the musical theater canon through study and performance. Students will overview the origins and history of American musical theater and its related expressions in other cultures. Students will gain basic vocal production and musical skills related to musical theater as well as work on vocal production and diction for speech. Students will choose appropriate material to learn, study and by term end perform. The course will be differentiated based on prior knowledge and skill and is open to all with interest and the willingness to learn dramatic and musical material.

As a music elective, choir is a vocal ensemble designed to introduce students to choral ensembles at the high school level. The purpose of the choir is to actively engage and motivate students in the process of learning music by singing a variety of music. Students will develop the vocal skills and sight-singing skills of each individual in order to perform as a confident and efficient group member. This class will give students the opportunity to learn a wide variety of vocal techniques, to sing a diverse variety of music from many historic periods, perform on stage before an audience and improve individual musical abilities. In addition, students will gain a basic knowledge of music fundamentals, including western musical notation, terminology and symbols, as well as vocabulary necessary for all rehearsed and performed music.

This course takes the student through the fundamentals of pop songwriting. The classroom will be set up with instruments (guitars, keyboard, bass, drums, amps and full PA system for singers) available for group or individual work and study. Students who play other instruments are encouraged to bring those and participate in the class work. The class will attempt to write songs as a group, will break off into smaller units for collaborative writing and will also participate in individual work. Areas of study will be the difference between lyrics and poetry and where the two intersect, the historical context of different song styles and how to understand the difference between what is acceptable or appropriate when writing in different genres, song structure, form, phrasing, rhyme and rhythm. Added in the second term will be a Blues-Rock Workshop which will teach a deeper understanding of ensemble playing, improvisation and will enhance the Songwriting expertise of beginners and the more experienced students in the class.

The IB Music course is designed to develop listening, creative and analytical skills, as well as encouraging cultural understanding and international-mindedness. In this way, music is a catalyst for expanding critical thinking—a crucial life skill. During the course, students and teachers engage in a journey of imagination and discovery through partnership and collaboration. Students develop and affirm their unique musical identities while expanding and refining their musicianship. Students are encouraged to explore music in varied and sometimes unfamiliar contexts. Additionally, by experimenting with music, students gain hands-on experience while honing musical skills. Through realizing and presenting samples of their musical work with others, students also learn to communicate critical and artistic intentions and purpose. As students develop as young musicians, the course challenges them to engage practically with music as researchers, performers and creators, and to be driven by their unique passions and interests while also broadening their musical and artistic perspectives.

This course focuses on developing students’ musical abilities and interests. Learners listen to music, analyze it, perform individually and in groups, compose music, and develop their aesthetic and emotional involvement with music. As a result, they enhance their appreciation and enjoyment of music which promotes future studies and enhances life-long enjoyment of music. Students learn to construct a critical response to, understand and practice a variety of musical styles from Western and non-Western traditions in order to recognize the cultural similarities and differences. The course also focuses on teaching basic musical skills and knowledge. Students are encouraged to use both an instrument and their voices to create music.

This introductory music course is for students with little to no musical background, but who have a desire to learn music. The only prerequisite is an interest in music and a desire to explore the rudiments of music including singing, piano and guitar, music history, music theory, music analysis, ethnic music of the world and composition.  Students who excel in this course could possibly place into the advanced Music course in their tenth-grade year. The activities of the class are divided into four major categories: 1. Introduction to music theory, terminology and music history, 2. learning about and practical playing various musical instruments, 3. learning basic compositional techniques, 4. ensemble and group playing.

This hands-on course will introduce students to the fundamentals of using software and hardware tools for commercial music production (computer, digital audio workstation, audio interface, analog synthesizer, midi controller). In addition, students will learn the fundamentals of music theory and music elements including duration, melody, harmony, structure, timbre, texture and expression. Students will explore their individual creativity and artistic expression through practical exercises and projects in creating new sounds, beats, and editing audio. They will use the basic building blocks of music to compose and arrange their own music.

This beginner-level semester-long course is designed for those who are interested in learning basic piano skills and techniques. Students will work on proper posture and hand position, independence of fingers and hands. They will play scales and technical exercises designed for the development of basic piano technique, as well as play appropriate beginning piano repertoire. Part of this course will concentrate on music reading and writing, counting/rhythm, music perception and evaluation. Written quizzes and in-class performances will be used for assessment.

The class is open to students at every level of guitar skill, from beginner to intermediate and advanced. Students will start with finger exercises designed to develop the muscle memory and ambidextrous requirements for learning chords in the context of chord progressions, and also for single note playing which will advance toward scales, modes, blues licks and melodic passages. The class will include the application of general music theory including, but not limited to, reading chord charts, guitar tab and traditional guitar music notation. Students will be introduced to strumming patterns, and fingerstyle playing. Intermediate and advanced students will take their skills to higher heights developing sound practice methods for attaining more sophisticated mastery on the guitar and the use of upper extension chord voicings. In addition to individual playing, students will play in small ensembles and improvise on blues, rock, pop and jazz progressions.

Foundations of Art and Design is an introductory course for first time high school visual art students. This course examines the elements and principles of art and design as they relate both two-dimensionally and three-dimensionally in the visual arts. Using a broad variety of media involved in the processes of drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpting/constructing, an emphasis will be on learning design concepts and the creation of artwork. Opportunities for personal expression, innovation, and creative problem-solving will be provided in this course. Visualization and conceptual thinking skills will be additionally strengthened with the integration of art history and digital photography.

The IB Diploma Programme visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought-provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem-solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art-makers. In addition to exploring and comparing visual arts from different perspectives and in different contexts, students are expected to engage in, experiment with and critically reflect upon a wide range of contemporary practices and media. The course is designed for students who want to go on to study visual arts in higher education as well as for those who are seeking lifelong enrichment through visual arts.

Students explore drawing by building on prior knowledge gained from the Foundations of Art and Design course. Students investigate a variety of mark-making techniques to record ideas and visual perceptions. Two-dimensional projects are created using a vibrant and versatile range of materials including graphite, charcoal, markers, pen, and pastels. Students will also have the opportunity to draw both digitally and in space using materials like thread, yarn, and wire.  Students are encouraged to work in new and challenging ways, such as large-scale works on paper and a series of connected images that are narrative and expressive, resulting in the development of a personal artistic style. Students will exercise their skills through direct observation of still life, portraiture, studio objects, and still images, but also experiment with drawing as a means to express personal and abstract ideas.

In this hands-on, process-based art course, students will experiment with designing and crafting three dimensional artworks using a variety of media including but not limited to cardboard, mixed media, found objects, and clay. In the process of brainstorming and developing artistic intentions, sketching will be required by students. The course supports students in developing several skills and techniques in ceramics such as hand-building, wheel throwing, and glazing works of clay.

Through the rich medium of painting, students will learn a variety of painting techniques while exploring traditional and experimental approaches to composition and color. The understanding of art as a communication tool and painting as a unique language is continuously explored and demonstrated in projects focusing on topics such as the EF Academy NY campus, studio objects, portraiture and photography, design and related sketchbook experiments. Students learn to construct their own canvas surfaces. Studio projects place a strong emphasis on process, such as the usefulness of sketches, compositional studies and underpaintings. Dynamic sketchbook assignments will enhance the process of ongoing studio projects. The viewing of relevant works of art provides students with the opportunity to make stylistic connections to significant artists and enrich their own works. Students will provide useful feedback to their peers, provide critical analysis, and reflect on their own painting projects. 

This is a one semester studio oriented course open to Grades 10 - 12. As an inquiry-guided investigation of art, Experimental / Interactive Art covers a wide range of mediums and techniques to support personal self expression. Students will demonstrate problem solving in two dimensional, three dimensional, and screen based artworks. This inquiry-guided investigation of art gives students opportunity for experimentation across traditional fine art disciplines.

Through the study of selected films, students explore aspects of filmmaking, including film history, theory and production. The course focuses on developing critical thinking through analytical study, providing an understanding for a wide range of perspectives, representing international points of view.  Excerpts from texts such as Master Shots (Kenworthy) &The Art of Watching Film (Petri) will be used in support. The formal assessment will be based on three basic components for SL and four components for HL. These include the Textual Analysis (in-depth analysis of a selected film), the Comparative Study (a video project comparing two films through theory), the Film Portfolio (production highlights from the two years) and for HL, the Collaborative Film project (a 7-minute film and reflection). Weekly assignments are primarily analyses of films along with critical evaluations of student film productions from a specific point of view.

Learning & Knowledge


Theory of Knowledge (TOK) is a course about critical thinking and inquiring into the process of knowing; ultimately, it’s about knowing about knowing. Students will examine how we know what we claim to know. The task of TOK is to emphasize connections between areas of knowledge (AOKs) and link them to the knower in such a way that the knower can become more aware of the origins of his or her own perspectives and those of the various groups whose knowledge he or she shares. Some of the topics include Knowledge & the Knower, Knowledge and Technology, Knowledge and Politics, and specific focus on Areas of Knowledge (math, history, arts, natural science, and human science). This course also incorporates essential research and writing skills to help students develop their IB Extended Essays, as well as the development of essential academic skills based on the IB Learner Profile.

CTE is for non-IBDP students as they continue their interdisciplinary learning from Theory of Knowledge in grade 11.  The course will focus on improving their research, critical thinking, argumentation, and teamwork skills. The concepts are based on 6 Big Questions derived from the Theory of Knowledge aims and objectives.

This L&K elective is a non–IB introductory philosophy course designed for grades 10 through 12. The structure of the class is based on the interdisciplinary field history of ideas: intellectual history taught through the lens of philosophy & critical theory. Unlike the IB course theory of knowledge, the proposed course places the focus less on the personal perspectives of students & more on the ideas themselves: the storied paths they traced, the amazing minds in which they were placed, and most of all, the failures they all invariably faced.

The students in this course will learn about the trajectory of Thought from the ancient period up into the transmodern. All through their journey there will be a pronounced emphasis on the long–distance importation of ideas, especially ideas from the Asian & African continents as they became assimilated — often in unconscious ways — into the dominant European traditions. The final unit of the course will then concentrate specifically on American Philosophy.

This is an introduction to critical thinking & logic from the perspective of game design. Students will study how they think via the use of a picture language that intuitively captures the human thought process. The beginning of the course will use already made games to explore the rules & limits of logic, while the end of the course will see the students designing their own games. This course serves as a great gateway into TOK for aspiring IB students.

This L&K elective is a non–IB course designed to provide a well-rounded introduction to some of the most fascinating elements of anthropology. Whilst anthropology can include biological and genetic studies, or archeological and historical approaches, this course will focus on social, linguistic and cultural explorations of humanity, with the aim of enabling each student to be able to critically reflect on their own learning, ideas and cultural perspectives.

Through engaging discussions, activities and reflections, students taking this course will learn about different kinds of human societies, beliefs and customs, exploring key theories, case studies and academic methodologies. By examining contemporary indigenous societies as well as the complexities of global city life, and comparing attitudes to clothing, food, art and technologies, students will learn to see their own familiar values, habits and assumptions in a new light.

This engaging L&K elective delves into the philosophical dimensions of emerging and future technologies. Unlike traditional technology courses, Technology of Tomorrow does not focus on practical applications to explore the deeper implications these innovations have on society and our understanding of reality. Drawing inspiration from visionary thinkers such as Marshall McLuhan, Neil Postman, and Martin Heidegger, the course invites students to critically examine the evolving interface between humanity and technology.

Furthermore, the curriculum is enriched with perspectives from science fiction luminaries, including Octavia Butler, Isaac Asimov, and Yevgeny Zamyatin. Their speculative narratives serve as a catalyst for discussion, challenging students to ponder the ethical, social, and existential questions that accompany technological advancement. Through a blend of discussions, readings, and project-based learning, participants will navigate through topics such as digital culture, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and the potential futures envisioned by science fiction. The course aims to equip students with the analytical tools necessary to critically assess and contribute to the dialogue surrounding technology's role in shaping our future.

World Languages


In this course, students will study a wide range of literary and non-literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide-ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis among others.

In this course, students will study a wide range of literary and non-literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide-ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis among others.

In this course, students will study a wide range of literary and non-literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide-ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis among others.

In this course, students will study a wide range of literary and non-literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide-ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis among others.

In this course, students will study a wide range of literary and non-literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide-ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis among others.

In this IB Literature course, students will focus exclusively on literary texts, adopting a variety of approaches to textual criticism. Students explore the nature of literature, the aesthetic function of literary language and textuality, and the relationship between literature and the world. Our focus will be on preparing for the rigorous IB literature exam. However, the ultimate goal of the course is to develop an appreciation of the literary works we will be immersing ourselves in.  In order to effectively analyze and explore texts, the classroom environment will focus on whole class discussion as well as student-led Harkness discussions, where the teacher facilitates discussion and the students take ownership of the analysis and exploration of the topics.

The IB Diploma Program Literature A Self-Taught Standard Level course offers students the opportunity to study the literature of a language that is not offered at the school as a taught subject. A high level of autonomy is expected from students taking this course. The course is built on the notion of conceptual learning. This means that the course is organized around concepts, or big ideas, which makes it easier to form connections between subjects and between parts of a course. Concepts are important as they are applicable and transferable to real-life situations. In this course, the central concepts are culture, communication, transformation, perspective, creativity, representation and identity.

This is an additional language-learning course designed for students with some command of the French language. It may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts, and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. The chosen material should enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. The themes explored are Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet. 

This is an additional language-learning course designed for students with some command of the Spanish language. It may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills should be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts, and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. The chosen material should enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. The themes explored are Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet.

The IB Diploma Program Language Ab Initio course is a language acquisition course designed for students with no prior experience of the Chinese language or for those with very limited previous exposure. It is only offered at the Standard Level.  The themes explored are Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet. Each theme has a list of topics that provide the students with opportunities to practice and explore the Chinese language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations.

The IB Diploma Program Language Ab Initio course is a language acquisition course designed for students with no prior experience of the French language or for those with very limited previous exposure. It is only offered at the Standard Level.  The themes explored are Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet. Each theme has a list of topics that provide the students with opportunities to practice and explore the French language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations.

The IB Diploma Program Language Ab Initio course is a language acquisition course designed for students with no prior experience of the Spanish language or for those with very limited previous exposure. It is only offered at the Standard Level.  The themes explored are Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organization and Sharing the Planet. Each theme has a list of topics that provide the students with opportunities to practice and explore the Spanish language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations.

  • French: Beginner & Intermediate, Accelerated & Advanced Levels

  • Spanish: Beginner & Intermediate, Accelerated & Advanced Levels

  • German: Beginner & Intermediate Levels

These are US High School language acquisition courses, which are designed for students who want to learn a language other than English or their native language. The language acquisition courses are divided into levels. Students in the beginner level will build a foundation for further study in the selected language acquisition. For the intermediate level, students must have studied the language in the previous year(s), or demonstrate some proficiency in the language with a CEFR of A1/A2. Students with a CERF of a B1+ will be placed in the advanced level. Students will learn how to communicate in the target language while also learning about the cultures where the language is used. Throughout the courses, students will demonstrate their understanding of the language by reading, writing, listening and speaking in the foreign language. Students will also learn how to communicate in real-life scenarios.

Advisory & CAS


The Advisory program at EF Academy is designed to build a strong family feel both within each Advisory group, grade level, and the wider EF community.  The Advisory program aims to achieve this by providing students with a safe space for self-expression and to build confidence for personal and socio-emotional development.  These skills are inherent in our philosophical commitment to the IB Learner Profile and the EF Graduate Profile. Students work throughout the year with their advisor, building relationships that form the foundation for a student’s holistic development.

Students taking the IBDP will also use Advisory time to plan & reflect on their CAS experiences and conduct their CAS interviews. Ongoing CAS experiences are a requirement of the IBDP. Students must plan and implement experiences that happen outside the classroom which allow them to follow their interests, talents and skills; this can happen with clubs, sports, or individual activities.

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